A director of technical assistance from Vermillion, South Dakota...

Eric Newhouse

On preparing for his Masters appearance, Eric says, "I played Jeopardy! online a few times. Oddly enough, I had a hard time getting anyone to stick around for an entire game." That's really not so surprising when you know that no less an authority than Alex Trebek himself dubbed the 1989 Teen Tournament winner "Powerhouse." It was a nickname Eric merited again as winner of the Teen Reunion in 1998. Now a Director of Technical Assistance with the Alzheimer's Association in Sioux City, Iowa, Eric's game plan is as succinct ("Strike hard. Strike quick.") as his own self-penned bio: "Sometimes he played well. Sometimes he played badly. But he never played boring."

Hi, I'm Eric Newhouse, alias "Powerhouse," alias Jeopardy! champion. Right now you're watching me on jeopardy.com.

When did you first appear on Jeopardy!?
Originally, my first appearance was in the Teen Tournament of 1989, which I think was the third one they ever did.

How much money did you win in your previous competitions?
You know, I saw--I don't know for certain, but the only reason I know this is I saw it on a web site--but it has it at $93,000, I think. All total.

Do you get recognized from your previous Jeopardy! appearances?
Uh, you know, it comes and it goes. When there's a rerun one, and I'll get it once in a while where--apparently there's a Game Show Network where they're bringing back old episodes. I don't know whether I'll get run into people asking what happened to my hair or not. But, um, no. It's quieted down. Y'know, I don't still get a lot of it. Because most of the people I know already already know.

What do you remember most from your previous appearances on Jeopardy!?
Probably the most memorable thing that comes to mind is five years ago in the Teen Reunion Tournament when I blew two Daily Doubles in the second round and still won. I--I don't know whether that's some sort of milestone, but, uh, that was, that was a life-affirming experience.

"He won both the 1989 Teen Tournament and the 1998 Teen Reunion Tournament. He's now a director of technical assistance for the Alzheimer's Association. From Vermillion, South Dakota..."

2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions Nifty Nine (players with byes into Round 2) member: $25,000.
2002 Million Dollar Masters Tournament 1st runner-up: $100,000.
1998 Teen Reunion Tournament winner: $50,000.
1990 Super Jeopardy! semifinalist: $10,000.
1989 Tournament of Champions semifinalist: $5,000.
1989 Teen Tournament winner: $28,100.

Eric appeared in the following 4 archived games:
#4087, aired 2002-05-14 Brad Rutter vs. Eric Newhouse vs. Bob Verini 2002 Million Dollar Masters final game 2.
#4086, aired 2002-05-13 Brad Rutter vs. Eric Newhouse vs. Bob Verini 2002 Million Dollar Masters final game 1.
#4083, aired 2002-05-08 Bob Harris vs. Leslie Shannon vs. Eric Newhouse 2002 Million Dollar Masters semifinal game 1.
#4080, aired 2002-05-03 Chuck Forrest vs. Leslie Frates vs. Eric Newhouse 2002 Million Dollar Masters quarterfinal game 3.
Eric previously appeared on Jeopardy! as Eric Newhouse in the following 2 archived games:
#3270, aired 1998-11-20 David Javerbaum vs. Chris Capozzola vs. Eric Newhouse 1998 Teen Reunion Tournament final. From the Wang Center for...
#3268, aired 1998-11-18 Stefanie Wulfestieg vs. Eric Newhouse vs. Julie Robichaux 1998 Teen Reunion Tournament preliminary game 3. From the Wang...
Eric would later appear on Jeopardy! as Eric Newhouse in the following archived game:
#4757, aired 2005-04-19 Steve Berman vs. Eric Newhouse vs. Shane Whitlock 2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions Round 2, game 5.

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