Show #3214 - Thursday, July 16, 1998

Contestants

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Blaine Faulkner, a chief financial officer from Escondido, California

Susan Fisher, an administrative assistant from Seattle, Washington

William Toren, a copy editor from Northridge, California (whose 2-day cash winnings total $6,800)

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Jeopardy! Round

5-LETTER CAPITALS
SPORTS
PRE-COLUMBIAN CULTURES
20th CENTURY INVENTION
ON THE MOVE
DOUBLE TALK
    $100 1
12 avenues radiate from Place Charles de Gaulle in this city
    $100 22
This Florida-born women's great who retired in 1989 wrote the World Book Encyclopedia article on tennis
    $100 26
Probably the biggest big game the Clovis culture went after 11,200 years ago, it was woolly
    $100 10
3M's Richard Drew invented it in 1930 to have something to seal the cellophane of food products
    $100 12
Long, flat-bottomed & painted a somber black, they're the traditional taxis of Venice
    $100 7
In the familiar jokes, it precedes "Who's there?"
    $200 3
Bridges crossing the Nile River in this capital include El Gama'a & El Giza
    $200 18
In 1984 this quarterback became the first Boston College player to win the Heisman Trophy
    $200 27
The Folsom culture about 10,900 years ago had a fluted type of this weapon & a "thrower" for it
    $200 11
Newsweek reports Westinghouse made one in 1952 that played "How Dry I Am" at the end of each cycle
    $200 17
In 1980 the U.S. government loaned this auto company $1.5 billion; the loans were repaid within 3 years
    $200 13
It's a sailor's way of saying to a superior "I understand & will obey"
    DD: $300 4
Haiphong near the Gulf of Tonkin serves as this city's main port
    $300 2
Babe Ruth's father once operated a saloon on what is now center field in this Baltimore ballpark
    $300 28
The Anasazi, a word from this Indian language for "ancient ones", lived in what's now the 4 Corners area
    $300 15
In 1939 the Hydra-Matic system made this automatic in the Oldsmobile
    $300 19
This U.S. city has more miles of subway than any other subway system in the Western Hemisphere
    $300 14
This full, loose women's garment with a bright print is traditional attire in Hawaii
    $400 5
The ancient Greeks called this Jordanian capital Philadelphia
    $400 8
In the 1997 Belmont Stakes, Touch Gold dashed this "charmed" horse's Triple Crown bid
    $400 29
The Adena-Hopewell culture in the Ohio area was known for building these, both the burial & effigy types
    $400 16
In 1983 the first U.S. commercial call on one of these was from Chicago to a descendant of Bell in Germany
    $400 20
In Britain, it's a kitchen on a ship's deck; in the U.S., it's traditionally the last car on a freight train
    $400 23
It's a hand-beaten drum used by American Indians
    $500 6
In 1809 one of the first revolts for independence in Latin America broke out in this Ecuadoran capital
    $500 9
National Hockey League team whose logo is seen here:
(knife through a "B")
    $500 30
Warriors of this Yucatan civilization battle in the computer-enhanced mural seen here:
    $500 25
They were invented in 1947 & by the 1990s millions were being placed on a single chip
    $500 21
When it opened, it cut the distance from London to Bombay by 5,100 miles
    $500 24
He's Barney & Betty Rubble's noisy son

Scores at the first commercial break (after clue 14):

William Susan Blaine
$700 $1,200 $400

Scores at the end of the Jeopardy! Round:

William Susan Blaine
$400 $2,300 $1,700

Double Jeopardy! Round

DIARIES
TOUGH MOVIE TRIVIA
"O" YOU ANIMAL!
INTERIOR DESIGN
NAME THE OPERA
PEOPLE WHO BECAME WORDS
    $200 23
The diary of this woman, wife of a famous aviator, describes the kidnapping of her son
    $200 10
Kurt Russell, who later played Elvis, was in the 1963 Elvis film "It Happened" here
    $200 1
The Pacific species of this has an arm span of up to 33 feet
    $200 26
The barrel species of this spiny plant can bring a touch of the desert into your home
    $200 2
["Habanera"]
    $200 8
Don't lose your head trying to name this execution device named after a French doctor
    $400 19
Fittingly, Samuel Pepys began keeping his famous diary on this date in 1660
    $400 15
It's what you wear to protect yourself against the effects of the device seen here:
    $400 4
"Cool" cat seen here:
    $400 27
Some 18th c. chairs had footrests to accommodate the swollen feet of sufferers from this disease
    $400 3
[Audio clip in Italian from opera about clowns]
    $400 11
Up on the highwire you might wear this bodysuit named for a famous 19th century trapeze artist
    $600 20
"My Name Escapes Me" is "The Diary of a Retiring Actor" by this portrayer of Obi-Wan Kenobi
    $600 16
Actor in common to the coming-to-California films "True Romance" & "Kalifornia"
    $600 5
It "coughs" out sediment by clapping its shell shut
    $600 24
China & India provide many of the "imports" in the name of this Texas-based home furnishings retailer
    $600 9
["La donna è mobile"]
    $600 12
This term for artillery fragments is named for a British officer who invented a new kind of shell
    $800 21
This creator of Peter Rabbit devised a private code for the journals she kept in her youth
    $800 17
1996's "Trainspotting" was about the underground drug life in this city
    $800 6
They might swing through the trees asking "What's Sumatra? Nothing, what's Sumatra with you?"
    $800 28
Type of chair seen here named for its 20th c. designer:
    $800 25
["Triumph March"]
    $800 13
This food poisoning bacteria is named after the scientist who identified it, not a fish
    DD: $2,000 22
The anonymous author of this diary took her title from the Jefferson Airplane song "White Rabbit"
    $1000 18
In this 1989 film, Eddie Murphy was the adopted son of a 1930s nightclub owner played by Richard Pryor
    $1000 7
When the giraffe invites all its taxonomic "family" to a party, this is the only animal that shows up
    DD: $1,000 29
In 1991 Charles Hall sued Aqua Queen & other companies for infringing his patent on this furniture item
    $1000 14
She must have been hairy, as this hairstyle is named for the big-haired mistress of a French emperor

Scores at the end of the Double Jeopardy! Round:

William Susan Blaine
$5,600 $5,300 $5,900

[wagering suggestions for these scores]

Final Jeopardy! Round

TELEVISION & HISTORY
(Alex: Combination of the two.)
When "60 Minutes" premiered, this man was U.S. president

Final scores:

William Susan Blaine
$5 $10,500 $11,300
3rd place: Pair of Jaguar Sport Watches 2nd place: Trip to Lake Arrowhead Resort, California New champion: $11,300

Game dynamics:

Game dynamics graph

Coryat scores:

William Susan Blaine
$5,600 $5,600 $4,900
18 R
(including 1 DD),
6 W
17 R,
3 W
(including 1 DD)
16 R
(including 1 DD),
2 W

Combined Coryat: $16,100

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