J! Archive Help

Contents

  1. Contents
  2. Using the J! Archive
  3. Glossary
  4. Credits

Using the J! Archive

Glossary

Batting average

n. the ratio of correct responses divided by possible correct responses for a player.

The numerator of the batting average is the total number of correct responses including the DDs and Final. The denominator is 58 (the number of non-DD clues in the game) plus the number of DDs the player uncovered. See also team batting average.

Boyd's Rule

n. a wagering "rule of thumb" that suggests that a player with a leading score going into Final Jeopardy! should wager to cover a doubled score by his or her closest trailing opponent.

etymology In the second semifinal game of the 2004 Tournament of Champions, aired September 28, 2004, 4-time champion Anne Boyd led 7-time champion Tom Walsh $14,700 to $11,800 going into Final Jeopardy! (5-time champion Chris Miller had the lead with $16,200.) Both Tom and Anne named the correct response ("Who is Ferlinghetti?") but Anne wagered $0, failing to cover Tom, who finished with $1 more than her (thus winning the game from third place and advancing to the finals).

nb An exception to Boyd's Rule exists in the Faith Love scenario. Shore's Conjecture disagrees with the premise of Boyd's Rule: it is not irrational for a leader to fail to make the shut-out wager.

Break point

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, a trailing player's score as a fraction of the leader's score at or above which a different wagering scenario enters into play. Break points occur at all k/(k + 1), for integer k, e.g., one-half, two-thirds, three-quarters, four-fifths...

Bridges's Rule

n. a wagering "rule of thumb" that suggests a player never bet to tie in Final Jeopardy! in tournament play, except if betting to win risks a loss that betting to tie would not risk.

etymology Named for Derek Bridges, who lost the 1996 Teen Tournament in the second final game to Amanda Goad on a tiebreaker clue. When the rule was named, it was thought that Bridges's score was high enough that he could have wagered for the win, but he chose to wager for a tie instead, prompting the decision of the tournament by sudden death. It has since been pointed out that, though Bridges had enough money that he could have wagered for the win, he actually wagered short of the tie, but, by coincidence, Amanda wagered short as well, such that their scores were tied by fluke.

Category

n. a collection of five clues, related by subject matter or otherwise, (ostensibly) arranged in order of difficulty, and assigned a (frequently punny) title and, sometimes, special instructions, e.g., for clues in a category the title of which contains words or letters in quotation marks, the correct responses will themselves contain (or sometimes begin with) those words or letters.

Clavin's Rule

n. a wagering "rule of thumb" that suggests a player not put a lock game at risk with an excessive wager, however tempting the category. Like Jeeks's Rule, Clavin's Rule can be extended to players seeking positions other than first place.

etymology In Episode 182 of Cheers, aired January 18, 1990, postal worker barfly Cliff Clavin (played by John Ratzenberger) became a contestant on (a ficticious game of) Jeopardy! and, to his delight, scored a blowout board composed of his favorite categories: STAMPS OF THE WORLD, BAR TRIVIA, BEER, MOTHERS & SONS, CIVIL SERVANTS, and CELIBACY. He had a lock game going into Final Jeopardy!, but wagered it all and blew it. (His now-infamous incorrect response to the clue "Archibald Leach, Bernard Schwartz and Lucille LeSueur" in the category MOVIES was, "Who are 3 people who've never been in my kitchen?" When told by Alex Trebek [played by himself], "No, I'm sorry, that too is wrong," Clavin responded, "Be that as it may, Alex, those people have never been in my kitchen.")

Clue

n. a "question" posed to Jeopardy! contestants, descriptively phrased as the answer to the correct response. Clues have some dollar value associated with them, except in cases of Daily Doubles or Final Jeopardy! clues, which are wagered upon prior to the revealing of the clue. Clues are typically read by Alex Trebek, but may sometimes be read by other celebrity readers, members of the Clue Crew, or announcer Johnny Gilbert.

At the start of the Jeopardy! Round, the returning champion, or the player at the leftmost podium if there is no returning champion, selects the first clue; thereafter, for the rest of the round, the clues are selected by the last player to give a correct response. At the beginning of the Double Jeopardy! Round, the player with the lowest score selects the first clue.

Combined Coryat

n. the sum of the Coryat scores of all three players.

$54,000 is the largest possible Coryat score in a game. The Combined Coryat will equal this when all clues are uncovered, no player gives an incorrect response (including on DDs), there are no Triple Stumpers, and no clue's value is awarded twice (due, for example, to a ruling reversal on an incorrect response).

Coryat score

n. a player's score if all wagering is disregarded. In the Coryat score, there is no penalty for forced incorrect responses on Daily Doubles, but correct responses on Daily Doubles earn only the natural values of the clues, and any gain or loss from the Final Jeopardy! Round is ignored.

pronunciation KOR-ee-at SCORE

etymology Named for Season 12 2-game champion Karl Coryat, who conceived of a scorekeeping method that would allow Jeopardy! hopefuls playing along at home to gauge their scores against the contestants playing on the show.

Crush

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the scenario in which the score of the player in second place is between one-half and two-thirds of the score of the player in first place. Under this scenario, given rational wagers by the players, a win is possible for the second-place player only if the the first-place player misses Final Jeopardy! and the second-place player gets it right. Here, the first-place player should bet enough so as to have at least one dollar more than the second-place player if the second-place player bets it all, and the second-place player should bet it all, since he or she must give the correct response to win anyway, unless he or she has a lock for second place and would prefer to limit his or her wager to protect that position.

etymology Suggested by 1996 Tournament of Champions winner Michael Dupée in his book How To Get on Jeopardy! and Win!

Daily Double (DD)

n. a clue that has no set dollar value associated with it, but rather, is wagered upon prior to the revealing of the clue. One DD is hidden amongst the 30 clues in the Jeopardy! Round; two DDs are hidden on the game board in the Double Jeopardy! Round. The maximum wager on a Daily Double is a player's score at the time of hitting upon the Daily Double clue (also known as a True Daily Double), or, if the player's score is less than the largest value of the clues on the board, then the player may wager that largest value amount ($1000 for the Jeopardy! Round or $2000 for the Double Jeopardy! Round). The minimum wager on a Daily Double is $5, which was half the smallest clue value on the original version of Jeopardy! that premiered in 1964 with Art Fleming as host.

Double Jeopardy! Round (DJ!)

n. the second round of a game of Jeopardy!, with two Daily Doubles concealed on a game board of 6 categories of five clues each, valued at $400, $800, $1200, $1600, and $2000, played without interruption for a commercial break. Money accumulated during the Jeopardy! Round remains in play for the Double Jeopardy! Round; money accumulated during the Double Jeopardy! Round may be risked in the Final Jeopardy! Round. During the Double Jeopardy! Round, responses must be phrased in the form of a question; if they are not, they are immediately ruled incorrect, without prompting or waiting for further clarification.

Faith Love

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the scenario in which the 1st-place player's score is equal to twice the difference between the scores of the 2nd- and 3rd-place players. Under this scenario, the 1st-place player should bet $0, because the 2nd-place contestant has reason to only bet to tie, since the bet to keep 3rd locked out is identical to the bet that would tie the leader if 2nd is correct.

etymology Named for 4-game champion Faith Love, who went 0 for 5 on Final Jeopardy! in her five games, November 25 through 29, 2002. In her 2nd game, the scores entering Final Jeopardy! were $10,400-$9,800-$4,600, with Faith in the lead, but instead of wagering $8,001 to cover a potential score doubling by the second place player, she famously bid $0 and won on the Triple Stumper. (Since the name "Faith Love" was coined, at least one antedating example of the use of this strategy has come to light, a 1994 Tournament of Champions semifinal in which Rachael Schwartz led Kurt Bray and Brian Moore $9,200-$8,600-$4,000 going into Final Jeopardy! and won by wagering $0. [Only Kurt Bray gave the correct response, but he wagered improperly, $100 short of the tie.])

notes Faith Love is less applicable when the 2nd-place player has less incentive to protect his or her position against the third-place player than to wager for the win. This becomes the case when the 2nd-place player's score is less than three-quarters of the leader's score (as, under that condition, the third-place player would be in a weak position). The wagering calculator thus only recommends Faith Love wagering when the 2nd-place player is within 3/4's of the leader's score and the 2nd-place player therefore has an incentive to keep from falling behind the 3rd-place player, who in such case does have a chance at winning.

Falk's Law

n. a pessimistic adage (in a similar vein to Murphy's Law) stating that the likelihood of supplying the correct response to a Daily Double or to the Final Jeopardy! clue is inversely proportional to the percentage of money wagered on such a clue.

etymology Originated by Season 22 4-game champion and 2006 Tournament of Champions winner Michael Falk.

Fearful wager

n. a Daily Double wager that risks less than the clue's natural value.

etymology Coined by Samer Ismail on 2005-10-17.

Final Jeopardy! Round (FJ! or Final)

n. the third round of a game of Jeopardy!, with 1 category consisting of 1 clue upon which players may risk any or all of the money accumulated during the previous rounds. During regular play, the player(s) with the highest total(s) at the end of the Final Jeopardy! Round come back in the following game to defend as the returning champion(s). (In the case of a tie, both [or all three] players return, except in the case that no player has any money [i.e., $0-$0-$0], whereupon all three players lose and three new players are introduced in the next game.) The Final Jeopardy! category is announced before the last commercial break; during this break, the players are given time to calculate their wagers, which they then make prior to the revealing of the clue after returning from the commercial break. Players with $0 or less at the end of the Double Jeopardy! Round do not return to play Final Jeopardy!

Four-fifths

1. n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the fourth break point, below which the scenario is three-quarters.

2. n. the scenario that exists at or above the four-fifths break point.

3. n. the "rule of thumb" that describes rational wagering for a trailing player whose score is at or above the four-fifths break point.

The four-fifths scenario is a special case of the two-thirds scenario in which a trailing player with a score at least four-fifths the score of the leading player going into Final Jeopardy! safely can, and therefore should, wager to beat the leader's maximum safe bet of the difference between scores with a bet of twice the difference between the two scores, without losing the double stumper against a shut-out bet by the leader. According to the Four-fifths Rule, the trailing player should wager between (2*(leader's score - own score) + $1) (venusian) and 3*(own score) - 2*(leader's score) (martian).

Forrest Bounce

1. n. a clue-selection strategy, employed during the Jeopardy! Round or the Double Jeopardy! Round, in which the next clue is selected from a randomly-chosen category different from the category of the last clue, potentially giving an advantage to the player with control of the board by confusing his or her opponents.

2. v. to switch categories by such a strategy.

etymology Named for 1986 Tournament of Champions winner and Million Dollar Masters semifinalist Chuck Forrest, who employed the technique to win $72,800 (in pre-doubled clue value dollars) over five games in Season 2. According to Michael Dupée's book How To Get on Jeopardy! and Win!, Forrest called the strategy the "Rubin bounce" for his classmate at the University of Michigan Law School, who suggested it.

Jeeks's Rule

n. a wagering "rule of thumb" that suggests that in a two- or three-way tie going into Final Jeopardy!, a player should wager either all or nothing. Cf. the prisoner's dilemma scenario.

etymology In game #3661, aired July 3, 2000, returning champion Jeeks Rajagopal found herself in just such a situation, with all three players at $5,200. Glen Savory and Mike Fazioli both wagered everything to tie for first place with $10,400 apiece, but Jeeks wagered only $5,000. She finished with $10,200, spoiling a chance for a first-ever three-way tie game. (Glen was eventually defeated in his fourth game by Doug Lach, for whom Lach Trash is named.)

Jeopardy! Round (J!)

n. the first round of a game of Jeopardy!, with one Daily Double concealed on a game board of 6 categories of five clues each, valued at $200, $400, $600, $800, and $1000, and interrupted at the time midpoint for a commercial break and contestant interviews.

Lach Trash

n. in a round or game of Jeopardy!, Triple Stumpers for which the correct responses are known by a Jeopardy! viewer playing along from home; also, the total dollar-value score associated with such Triple Stumpers.

pronunciation LASH TRASH

etymology "Lach" from Doug Lach, Jeopardy! Season 16 5-time champion and $85,400+ winner, who commented on the Jeopardy! Message Board that his definition of a bad game was one that could be won on Triple Stumpers alone; "Trash" from trash; coined by Mark Barrett in his November 28, 2002 recap of Faith Love's second game (which, coincidentally, is also the origin of the Faith Love scenario).

Lock

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the scenario in which the score of the player in second place is less than one-half the score of the player in first place. Under this scenario, the leader is assured a victory so long as he or she does not wager more than (leader's score - 2*(second place score)), or (leader's score - 2*(second place score) - $1) to prevent the possibility of a tie.

To overwager in a lock scenario violates Clavin's Rule.

aka a runaway (the term Alex uses on the show).

Lock-tie

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the scenario in which the score of the player in second place is exactly one-half the score of the player in first place. Under this scenario, the leader is assured a victory or a tie victory so long as he or she wagers $0; the second-place player should go for the tie and wager everything.

Marktiple Choice

n. the process of coming up with the correct response, particularly during Final Jeopardy!, by eliminating all but the most promising response(s) from a list of guesses.

aka Dawson Crossin'.

etymology Named for Season 18 5-time champion and 2003 Tournament of Champions winner Mark Dawson, who first put the method to use in his 3rd regular-season game: "...it is a common practice when playing bar trivia. You write down each person's best guess, then start crossing them off. As I sometimes miss FJ's by seizing on a single answer and not letting go, I decided that for the ToC, I would make an effort to use this technique whenever there was any doubt." The variant "Dawson Crossin'" was coined by Doug Lach, for whom Lach Trash is named.

Martian

adj. aggressive in wagering strategy on Daily Double and Final Jeopardy! clues; wagering to maximize winnings. Cf. venusian.

One-half

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the first break point, below which the scenario is a lock, at exactly which the scenario is a lock-tie, and above which the scenario is a crush.

Prisoner's dilemma

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the scenario in which two players are tied for the lead and the third player has less than one-half their scores. Under this scenario, the leaders must each independently decide whether the other will bet $0 or everything, and then bet likewise. Betting everything has the unfortunate outcome of a double loss in the case of a double stumper: $0 is never a winning score on Jeopardy! The third-place player should risk nothing in this scenario.

Pure trivia

n. a fact that is sufficiently arcane so as to be beyond the realm of common knowledge. Cf. trash.

example "That Final Jeopardy! response, The Burghers of Calais, was pure trivia: either you knew it or you didn't."

Regular play

n. Jeopardy! games not belonging to a special week (e.g., Celebrity Jeopardy!, Power Players Week, or Kids Week) or two-week tournament (e.g., the Tournament of Champions, the College Championship, or the Teen Tournament). During regular play, winning champions succeed losing champions (with one notable exception in Season 24). Prior to a rule change that went into effect at the beginning of the 20th Season [2003-2004], a champion could win a maximum of 5 games, whereupon he/she would retire and later return for the next Tournament of Champions.

Response

n. a contestant's "answer" to a clue, phrased in the form of a question. A correct response results in the addition to a player's score the value of the clue (or, for Daily Doubles or Final Jeopardy! clues, the player's wager); an incorrect response results in the subtraction from the player's score the clue's value (or the wager). A clue may have multiple different acceptable correct responses or correct response variations, some of them unanticipated by the writers and judges. A successful challenge by a player to a response originally judged incorrect results in the awarding of the clue's cash value to that player's score, so that in some cases, a clue's value may be awarded to multiple players. Incorrect pronunciation (or spelling) is not penalized unless it adds (or deletes) a sound or syllable to (or from) the correct response.

Shore's Conjecture

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, a conjecture that betting only enough to stay ahead of a second-place player who is within two-thirds the score of the leader and who also wagers to keep the third-place player locked out gives the leader a better chance of winning than does making the shut-out bet. Shoretegic wagers presuppose a second-place player's aptitude to obey the Two-thirds Rule (though they may sometimes win even when the second-place player does not) and are in direct violation of Boyd's Rule.

etymology Proposed by Season 21 2-game champion Bob Shore.

Shoretegy

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, for games that fit Shore's Conjecture, a wager on the part of the score leader equal to one dollar more than the difference between the first place player's score and twice the difference between the second and third place players' scores.

etymology Portmanteau of "Shore's Conjecture" and "strategy"; fitting because a shoretegic wager falls "short" of a wager to cover.

Signaling device

n. a cylindrical, hand-held apparatus, topped by a push-button, and used by Jeopardy! contestants to signal their intent to respond to a clue.

What do you call a buzzer that doesn't buzz? A signaling device, that's what! The signaling devices used by the three players in a game of Jeopardy! resemble oversized click-pens, attached to computers concealed inside the contestant podiums by wire. After Alex finishes reading the clue, an off-camera assistant triggers a set of lights that surround the game board, prompting the contestants to go ahead and squeeze their signaling buttons if they think they know the correct response. Pressing the signaling button too early results in a fraction-of-a-second lockout during which the other contestants have a chance to ring in.

STAY CLAM

v. phrase to refrain from giving incorrect responses by guessing (as from nervousness or anxious desperation).

etymology Inadvertently coined by 2002 Back to School Week player Gracie Studdard (a twelve-year-old from Locust Grove, Georgia) in her August 2, 2003 post of advice to 2003 Back to School Week contestant Matt Bischoff (a twelve-year-old from Sicklerville, New Jersey): "When u get 2 Hollywood and ur about 2 film ur show, remember 2 STAY CLAM above all else. No matter what happens in the game, don't let urself get intimidated or nervous. I'ts just a game." 2002 champion Ronnie O'Rourke elaborated an hour later: "'Stay Clam' is actually excellent advice. If you're not sure you've got the correct response, keep your mouth shut. In other words, clam up."

Stratton's Dilemma

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the wagering scenario that exists when the minimum amount that the second-place player needs to wager to cover the third-place player's doubled score exceeds the maximum wager suggested by the Two-thirds Rule. In a Stratton's Dilemma game, the second-place player must decide whether to play for a win on a Triple Stumper (provided that the leader makes the shut-out bet) and risk being overtaken by the third-place player if he/she gets Final right, or wager to cover the third-place player at the expense of falling behind the leader's minimum shut-out wager on a Triple Stumper.

etymology Coined by Andy Saunders with reference to Season 21 2-time champion Ted Stratton's first game, #4695, aired 2005-01-21.

Team batting average

n. the ratio of correct responses by all players divided by possible correct responses in a game.

The numerator of a team batting average is the sum of the batting average numerators for all three players; the denominator of the team batting average for a game is always 63 (the total number of potential correct responses), even if clues are left unrevealed or players don't stick around for Final Jeopardy! Thus the team batting average can serve as a measure of game efficiency: games in which many clues are left unrevealed will have lower team batting averages.

Tease-Out Metric (TOM)

n. for a given clue, the qualitative "measure" of the probability for arriving at a correct response based on information given in the clue or its category but peripheral to the clue's central hint, perhaps not by any logical process, but rather by an analogical association. Usually applied to Daily Doubles or Final Jeopardy! clues (as there is typically not enough time to "tease out" a correct response on a timed clue in the Jeopardy! or Double Jeopardy! rounds) and to clues for which the correct response is a common-knowledge word, name, title, phrase, etc. A clue for which a common-knowledge correct response may be readily analogically derived is said to have a high TOM; a clue/response pair with a very low TOM is said to be pure trivia.

etymology After a brief lifetime as "tease-out factor," the backronym Tease-Out Metric was coined from TOM, in honor of Season 19 3-time champion Tom Kelso, who originated the phrase in posts on the official Jeopardy! Message Board when he mentioned that he was sometimes able to "tease-out" the correct responses on tough clues. The name "Tease-Out Metric" is something of a misnomer, as it is unquantifiable, variable from player to player, and has no defined scale associated with it, and is thus not really a metric at all.

The Powers That Be (TPTB)

n. pl. the producers, clue writers, and contestant coordinators of the Jeopardy! television show. May also include the Standards & Practices auditors who oversee all games to ensure fairness. The term is intended to be inclusive of all those who have a say in contestant selection and treatment.

Three-quarters

1. n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the third break point, below which the scenario is two-thirds.

2. n. the scenario that exists at or above the three-quarters break point (and below the four-fifths break point).

3. n. the "rule of thumb" that describes rational wagering for a trailing player whose score is at or above the three-quarters break point.

The three-quarters scenario is a special case of the two-thirds scenario in which a trailing player with a score at least three-quarters the score of the leading player going into Final Jeopardy! safely can, and therefore should, wager to cover a $0 bet by the leader. According to the Three-quarters Rule, the trailing player should wager between (leader's score - own score)--or, if affordable, (leader's score - own score + $1)--(venusian) and 3*(own score) - 2*(leader's score) (martian).

Tiebreaker Round (TB)

n. a single-clue, "sudden death" round played after Final Jeopardy! in the event of a tie during tournament play or special nontournament play. The first player to provide a correct response wins the game.

Tiebreaker Rounds are only known to have appeared seven times:

  1. The first quarterfinal game of the 1992 College Championship. This was the first time there was a tie for first place in a tournament match, with two players finishing Final Jeopardy! with $11,000.
    The category: AMERICAN AUTHORS
    The clue: His first novel was "The Torrents of Spring", but most know his next, "The Sun Also Rises"
    The correct response: Who is Ernest Hemingway?
    (Three separate tiebreaker clues had to be played before Chris Montplaisir was declared the winner over Ken Kansa, but the first two tiebreakers were edited out of the broadcast game because neither player gave a correct response to either of them. The whole exercise turned out to be moot, because Ken's score earned him a wildcard spot into the semifinals. Neither player advanced to the finals.)
  2. The second final game of the 1996 Teen Tournament, to determine the overall winner between Derek Bridges and Amanda Goad. (Derek had a high enough score going into Final Jeopardy! to wager for the win, but mistakenly wagered for the tie instead.)
    The category: 1995
    The clue: A November 1995 Bosnian peace accord is named for this city
    The correct response: What was Dayton, Ohio?
    (Amanda responded correctly and went on to become a 1996 Tournament of Champions semifinalist.)
  3. The first semifinal game of the 1997 College Championship (#2941, aired 1997-05-19), to detemine who, between Steven Bevier and Brian Chan, would go on to become a finalist. (Both were tied at $6,500 going into Final Jeopardy! and $13,000 coming out of it.)
    The category: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
    The clue: On Nov. 15, 1777 Congress adopted this constitution but it wasn't ratified by the states until March 1, 1781
    The correct response: What is the Articles of Confederation?
    (Steven responded correctly and went on to become the 1997 College Championship 2nd runner-up.)
  4. The last game of the 2002 Back to School Week (#4150, aired 2002-09-20), won by Mike Scott.
    The category: LITERARY CHARACTERS
    The clue: Hogwarts headmaster, he's considered by many to be the greatest wizard alive
    The correct response: Who is Professor Dumbledore?
    (Mike, who had the lead going into Final Jeopardy! with $10,800 to his nearest opponent's $9,000, wagered only $7,200, playing for tie rather than for the win. Lucky for him, he gave the correct response to the tiebreaker clue.)
  5. The second semifinal game in the 2007 Tournament of Champions (#5332, aired 2007-11-13), in which Christian Haines and Celeste DiNucci both wagered to cover DJ! leader Jeff Spoeri by a dollar in Final Jeopardy! should he have wagered nothing, but only Jeff gave an incorrect Final response.
    The category: CHILD'S PLAY
    The clue: A Longfellow poem & a Lillian Hellman play about a girls' boarding school share this timely title
    The correct response: What is The Children's Hour?
    (Celeste won the Tiebreaker Round and advanced to the finals, ultimately winning the Tournament of Champions.)
  6. The last quarterfinal game in the 2012 Teen Tournament (#6730, aired 2012-05-04), in which DJ! leader Gabriela Gonzales wagered $8,000 instead of the minimum necessary $7,001 to cover second-place player Evan Eschliman, who apparently wagered $1,200 so as to have had an even $15,000 had he gotten the correct response in Final Jeopardy!, but ended up with $12,600 after his miss. To her misfortune, Gabriela's score was coincidentally the same after her miss and overwager.
    The category: LITERARY CHARACTERS
    The clue: Although he doesn't actually appear in "1984", his presence is everywhere--on posters, coins & telescreens
    The correct response: Who is Big Brother?
    (Evan buzzed in first with the correct response to advance to the semifinals, whereas Gabriela's score was insufficient to earn her a wildcard spot.)
  7. The deciding game of the 2014 Teen Tournament (#6895, aired 2014-08-01), in which both final game 2 leader Jeff Xie and final game 1 high scorer Alan Koolik both wagered everything in Final Jeopardy!, both responded correctly, and became tied with two-game totals of $54,200. Alex Trebek announced the Tiebreaker Round:
    The category: THE CIVIL WAR
    The clue: The Battles of Shiloh & Collierville were fought in this state
    The correct response: What is Tennessee?
    (Jeff buzzed in first with the correct response to win the $75,000 Teen Tournament prize.)

Tortoise and the hares

n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the scenario in which two players are tied for the lead and the third player has at least one-half their scores. This scenario is similar to the prisoner's dilemma with the exception that $0 wagers by the leaders may result in the third place player overtaking them. Thus, the leaders must both wager everything, and the third place player should bet enough to beat a leader that wagers $0.

Trash

n. especially arcane pure trivia, usually pop culture- or sports-related, often of a subject matter in which such depth of knowledge ought to be embarrassing.

example "I correctly responded that Avril Lavigne's middle name is Ramona and that she was born in Napanee, Ontario. Don't ask me how I knew that trash!"

etymology A term from quizbowl for questions discarded from packets for their absurd obscurity or appeal to a too-specific knowledge set. Such trivia material evolved into a genre of its own and has spawned tournaments such as Testing Recall About Strange Happenings.

Triple Stumper (TS)

n. a clue for which no correct response is given by any player.

True Daily Double (TDD)

n. a Daily Double for which a player wagers his or her entire score, so that a correct response will double his/her score, but an incorrect reponse will reset it to zero.

Two-thirds

1. n. in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy, the second break point, below which the scenario is a crush.

2. n. the scenario that exists at or above the two-thirds break point (and below the three-quarters break point).

3. n. the "rule of thumb" that describes rational wagering for a trailing player whose score is at or above the two-thirds break point.

In the two-thirds scenario, a trailing player with a score at least two-thirds the score of the leading player going into Final Jeopardy! should wager between $0 (venusian) and 3*(own score) - 2*(leader's score) (martian), according to the Two-thirds Rule. Wagering more than this actually lowers the trailing player's odds of winning by reducing the number of favorable outcomes in the payoff matrix from 2/4 to 1/4. An interesting side-effect of the Two-thirds Rule is that a bet to cover by the leader renders inconsequential the trailing player's Final Jeopardy! response: whether the two-thirds trailing player gets right or misses Final Jeopardy!, he or she will win if the leader misses it (presuming that a third player is not a factor).

Venusian

adj. conservative in wagering strategy on Daily Double and Final Jeopardy! clues; wagering to minimize losses. Cf. martian.

Weak

adj. characteristic of the third-place player's position in Final Jeopardy! wagering strategy when the third-place player's score is less than the difference between the first place player's score and the second-place player's score at the end of the Double Jeopardy! Round. In such a case, the 3rd-place player cannot win the game if the leading players wager rationally.

ZergCam

n. during the reveal of the Final Jeopardy! Round responses and wagers, a camera shot trained on a player with a trailing score going into the round to capture that player's reaction to a surprise win.

etymology Coined by Jordan Honan after its use to show Robert Slaven's reaction to his come-from-behind win in his Ultimate Tournament of Champions Round 2 game against Eugene Finerman and Michael Dupée, after Nancy Zerg, whose reaction to her come-from-behind win against Ken Jennings (#4657, aired 2004-11-30) was the first to be captured by a camera shot trained on her immediately following the reveal of Ken's wager in his losing game. In an epilogue to a rerun of this game aired on 2009-09-10, Alex Trebek acknowledged the fan use of the term.

The following contestants have had their come-from-behind wins captured on ZergCam: Nancy Zerg, Grace Veach, Leah Greenwald, Lara Robillard, Scott Gillispie, Robert Slaven, Frank Spangenberg, Jerome Vered, Melissa Prepster (twice), Diane Mettam, Kevin Marshall (twice), Michael Falk, Kathleen Larkey, Gigi Gilman, Vik Vaz, Jim McMurtry, Dave Singleton, Ryan Friedman, Samantha Ross, Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton, Max Zarou, Srinivas Ayyagari, Robin Woods (twice), Kristina Caffrey, Larissa Kelly, Lowell Goodman, Amy Wilson, Ryan Fox, Monica Thieu, and Zack Terrill.

Credits

Founding archivists

Robert K S
Andy Saunders
Kenneth Jennings, Jr.
Joe Giannotti
Ed Bohncke
Will Morris

Charter archivists

Robert McIelwain
Mark Barrett
Benjamin D. Wiles
Kevin Lake
Mary Keefe
Brendan Pimper
Steve McClellan
Guy Tabachnick
Kyle Hale
Allen Lee
Myron M. Meyer
Jonathan Henke
Mickey Stevens

Archivists

Calle Fitzgerald
Mitchell Hofing
Jordan Stopciati
Phil Scopes
John Lee
Ian Manka
Ben DeMott
Mary Beam
Eric Barela
Chad Mosher
DK Lee
Vincent Salzillo
Curtis Chiang
Renée Mathis
Kevin Prather
Chuck Conerity
Andy Greeley
Stuart Wasserman
Raghuveer Mukkamalla
David Kendall
Debra McGuire
Bill Manson
Jordan Honan
Michael Farabaugh

The J! Archive uses the fast, reliable hosting of Doctor PC.

The J! Archive is created by fans, for fans. The Jeopardy! game show and all elements thereof, including but not limited to copyright and trademark thereto, are the property of Jeopardy Productions, Inc. and are protected under law. This website is not affiliated with, sponsored by, or operated by Jeopardy Productions, Inc. Join the discussion at JBoard.tv.